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What Expert Authority World™ is saying about the show:

  • Loved the Craig Handley Episode
    by MHillfan from United States

    Mario’s energy is infectious and Craig Handley is a character and some. But really every episode brings out the uniqueness of each guest. This pod has become one of my must listens›

  • Inspiring. Informative.
    by SunDevil from United States

    Mario is incredibly inspiring and does something few other podcast hosts can manage to do… allow his guests to actuall talk at length and answer his questions. He offers great information and I really appreciate that he is invested in what his guests have to offer as well. Other podcasts come across as an ego stroke for the host, but this podcast is truly here to help guests share their stories as well to the benefit of the listener. Worth subscribing.

  • Game changer
    by TimLawson21 from United States

    This podcast is informative and inspiring. I love it!

  • If you are a wanna be entrepreneur look no further!
    by Elisa Di Napoli from United Kingdom

    Great podcast full of interesting insights. The host is engaging and thoughtful and I can say I have enjoyed listening to each episode!

  • Amazing Interviews not to miss!!!
    by Jbower1282 from United States

    Consistantly uniques interviews or amazing people really making it happen.

  • Mario is a great host with great questions!
    by alexdesigns from United States

    Take a few minutes out of your day to listen to Mario. He is a super smart guy and I love the questions he asks his guests.

  • A great podcast for dreamers and do-ers!
    by Chiquita2727 from United States

    Lots of great information and inspiration for anyone who wants to turn dreams into reality. Mario brings a lot of spot-on information to this podcast.

  • Great Show
    by Palminchen from London from United Kingdom

    Love the broad selection of topics for inner

  • Amazing inspirational stories
    by colas_18 from United Kingdom

    This podcast is so good. The stories from the people sharing their stories about their struggles in life and how they overcame these struggles is just inspirational and helped me push harder when things get tough. Keep up the good work with these amazing interviews Mario.

  • Fantastic
    by sttoggyigctdrvy from United States

    Mario goes above & beyond on his show. Lots of great information for his listeners!

  • Top Learning
    by BLNT PPTT from Hungary

    Love hearing these great interviews with a great host. Keep up the good work!

  • Mario inspires!
    by Fatherof10yrold from United States

    These interviews are fantastic. Mario inspires with great questions that draw out great answers from his guests!

  • Expert authority!
    by Tara Williams Phone from United States

    Mario shares some amazing people on this podcast and they have some gold to share!

  • Great show!
    by Karen @ Interview Valet from United States

    Mario is an awesome podcast host! I love the FB Live interviews and the opportunity for listeners to engage in real time. The audio and video quality is spot on every time. Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss anything! You won't be sorry.

  • A Podcasters Inspiration!
    by JamieKullman from United States

    Mario has so much insight and delivers such incredible value through his show. I just started listening, but I've already learned so much from him and his wonderful interviews. Keep up the awesome work!!

  • Quality professionalism
    by VirtForce from United States

    I can’t say enough about how pristine and professional Mario is in his interviews. He truly wants his guests to have the best experience and recording possible. And not to mention he is fun and knows how to put people at ease in front of the camera.

  • How to conquer your limiting beliefs
    by Dave4syth from United States

    Listen to episode 103 an dlearn how to overcome your limiting beliefs. Great advice.

  • I can’t believe how much I learned in just one episode
    by AwesomeMontana from United States

    Mario is knowledgeable, curious and able to bring great guests that deliver value that every business needs to understand! Outstanding podcast!

  • Great content!
    by Cory Lee Leadership from United States

    Mario does a great job of providing relevant information and bringing on guests to share their expertise in a variety of fields. Highly recommend his podcast!

  • Fascinating interviews
    by Bill Ringle from United States

    Mario brings on accomplished guests and draws out their expertise and stories in a way that leaves me on the edge of my seat. Keep up the great work, Mario!

  • Love It!
    by Laura Moreno Cabanillas from India

    Loving this podcasts, an entrepreneur I really appreciate the energy and passion being shared to help us grow our business. Keep up the great work.

  • Boost my Amazon sales!
    by SurvivalDad from United States

    I tap Amazon as one of my sales channels and your interview with John Ghiorso was an eye-opener. Ignore at your own peril!

  • Love It!
    by LauraMore from United States

    I loved the Memorial Day episode, Mario! Thanks so much for creating this awesome podcast!

  • Flawless interview style
    by GninraeL14 from United States

    Mario makes everyone appear even more interesting to me. Great format and style!

  • Come here for value
    by Joshua User 202! from Canada

    Really appreciated this podcast for the raw, genuine interviews. Love it!

  • Crisp and interesting interviews
    by Joel Goobich from United States

    As someone who created one of the first podcasts dedicated to video marketing, I was very impressed by your recent episode about using video. Your interview style is crisp and interesting

  • If you are in business, this podcast needs to be on your playlist.
    by Macstephen1 from United States

    Mario has a great conversational style that helps his guests shine. This show is a must if you have an entrepreneurial spirit. It provides thought provoking content that will help any businessperson in their quest for success.

  • New Subscriber here and on your YouTube Channel
    by Angela Brown Oberer from United States

    Wow Mario you have a real knack for interviewing. You ask great questions and have a fun way of keeping the conversations lively and interesting. After listening to your episode with Owen Video I subscribed to your podcast and then I hunted you down on YouTube. High Five and great job!

  • Very Professional & Engaging Show!
    by Mitche Graf from United States

    Mario is extremely engaging and can hold your attention, and is a great interviewer! He has some great guests that really get into the details of running a successful business. Keep up the great work Mario!

  • Great Content
    by Pilar S. from United States

    Excellent! LOTS of advice from experts. The most recent episode talks about speaking–a must-listen for anyone who presents or is thinking about presenting.

  • Great content!
    by @Mentally_Strong from United States

    I really enjoy your podcast each time I listen. The content helps any entreprenur level up with they do. Keep it up and thanks for each episode.

  • Professional and Informative
    by Bruce at Mindfulness Mode from Canada

    Mario Fachini is an excellent interviewer and has terrific guests on the show. I highly recommend this podcast.

  • Great Podcast
    by Amber Fuhriman from United States

    I love the topic of this podcast. The episode with Tod Lindsay is super super helpful!!

  • Great find!
    by Reed Stiles from United States

    Great message and content. Stumbled upon this due to the cool logo, stayed for the content.

  • Great show and great host!
    by Laurapowers44 from United States

    Love what Mario offers! So glad he is doing his show and providing all this helpful info! Keep them coming!

  • Walks the walk
    by Me15463 from United States

    Mario encapsulates everything he talks about on the show. Be sure to tune in to this!

  • Honest and authentic
    by Deano3622 from United Kingdom

    Wow, just come across this podcast. Mario is such an awesome guy. He comes across so honest and genuine. Loved the content. I honestly don’t know where you find the time?! Keep it up Mario, love how honest and real you are!

  • Great and insightful!
    by Karty12345 from Australia

    I really enjoyed this podcast, so much relevant content. Thank you!

  • So much Value..!
    by Alex Dali Rizo from United States

    Great content, I really recommend this to any Entrepreneur looking to excel in their path, Mario brings topic experts to teach and inspire your day

  • Inspirational Intentional Information
    by 10Kforte from United States

    This podcast shares the stories from people that are doing whatever it takes to rise up and help others along the way. “What Are You Made Of” is one of the many messages shared on the podcast. There are so many takeaways that are applicable to anyone. I really enjoyed listening.

  • Wow!
    by Tyscoaching from Australia

    Just listened to the 'rescue site AED Program' episode! If you love epic stories and inspirational people, this is the podcast for you!

  • Motivation on Tap
    by AnthonyPGarcia from United States

    Mario brings on some of the most impactful entrepreneurs to hear from. He dives into the key performance factors of their business. He extracts information very well and keeps the show flowing very smoothly. Definitely a show to subscribe to!

  • Starting a Movement
    by JustMe2say from United States

    There are many areas of business and entrepreneurs have an opporunity to gain some insight with this podcast. Excellent interviews!

  • Great Podcast For Entrepreneurs!
    by The Big Game Hunter from United States

    Full of knowledgeable guests and useful information that will help you accomplish your goals in business and in life!

  • Mario Truly Care About His Guests
    by Podcast Junkies from United States

    Having met Mario and spent time with him at Podfest I can truly say that he is passionate about his show. He’s genuine and that clearly comes through in his own story and what he brings to every interview.

  • Put your thinking cap on!
    by Cliff Duvernois from United States

    This is probably one of the most information dense podcasts I’ve listened to in many moons. Each episode could easily be expanded out into 2 or 3 hours. Mario does a great job of asking the right questions to get his guests to reveal great tips, tricks and advice. Sure a lot of information can be applied to an entrepreneur but I found a lot of advice applicable to my personal life. This podcast is definitely worth my time to listen to and I’m looking forward to more episodes to come. Great job!

  • Relavant for anyone!
    by HarloB from United States

    I really enjoy Mario and his shows. The Stress and Anger in the Workplace episode was great because it cut to the chase of all the issues around this topic. Great interview!

  • Mario nails it!
    by Mickiezada from United States

    I've listened to Mario for a long time...his podcast is well produced, his guests are influencers and authentic authority, and chock full of insights and inspiration for entrepreneurs. Love it!

  • Mario is the real deal
    by jamesnewcomb.io from United States

    I’ve known Mario personally and professionally for over a year now. He is genuinely interested in helping people succeed, and consistently over delivers in his interactions and valuable advice with fellow entrepreneurs, podcasters, what have you. In this era of showmen who “give value” only if they think they’ll get something in return, Mario stands out as a man among men. Listen to his show and learn what true leadership and value in the marketplace mean.

  • Listening On My Entrepreneurial Journey
    by FromLisa2 from United States

    I was surprised when I stumbled over the servant leadership that shows up in these episodes. It's collaborative. It's focused on relationships with clients versus transactions. I especially enjoyed the episode on getting clients without "selling" because it's more about genuine relationship building.

  • A Gift
    by Lisa Vogt from United States

    Mario uses all his talents, gifts and abilities to produce this life affirming show. It's incredible that we are able to grow our abilities and develop our talents and gifts just through subscribing and listening. Thank you Mario!

  • This show is ON FIRE!
    by tibor.mindsethorizon from United States

    Love your show Mario! Your niche is close to mine but I focus more on mindset and manifestation in a business setting. I tuned into episode #103 with Karen Brown which is dope! Keep up the great work!

  • Entrepreneur Must Listen
    by HWoodwriter from United States

    If you’re an entrepreneur this is a must listen show. So many inside tips and thought processes behind moving your business forward. Mario does a great job with the guests by asking the right questions at the right time. He and his guests give the information you need to grow your business and leadership skills.

  • What a show!!
    by CWLuecke from United States

    Man, do I love interviews with world-changers! Mario does an excellent job gathering the cream of the crop for his show and giving insightful interviews. Check it out!

  • Loved it!
    by Seodrigo from United States

    This interview was very enjoyable. Mario brought on a wise guest by the name of Michael Lauria. I loved the interview and Michael's perspective on the topic. He had wonderful insights and around min 31, he hit something very profound. Excited to share what I learned today with others. Way to go!

  • Great listen
    by trinity3712 from United States

    Good listen. Great range of guests and topics. Something here is you keep listening will help you in many areas of life and leadership b

  • Great Knowledge!
    by Jon Vroman FRD from United States

    Great show Mario! So much valuable information in one episode!

  • Excellent show, very imformative!
    by Shaolin Soprano from United States

    Mario loving the podcast bro, great content, immense value. Enjoying these interviews!!!

  • Helpful Information!
    by The Medicare Nation from United States

    Love the valuable information on these episodes! Lots of tips & tricks for every Entrepreneur to use. Kudos Mario! Diane Daniels Host of Medicare Nation

  • Love Mario’s Attitude
    by marisaimon from United States

    Mario’s heart shines through his interviews, making these fun and positive, and the people he brings on offer such a wealth of knowledge.

  • Lots of Great Info!
    by DarlajPowell from United States

    Mario provides lots of great info and advice in this 7 day a week show.

  • Great Content!
    by LanceJohnson_ from United States

    Mario does a great job of share valuable information that every entrepreneur could use and apply to their journey. Great work! 🙂

  • Important information!
    by Allmenow from United States

    Very engaging information. Mario draws out experiences and knowledge from his guests. Loved the show!

  • Difference-Maker
    by Unlimited Beliefs from United States

    Mario is a master at bringing out, shining a light on, and internalizing the difference-making mindset. His knowledge and experience and mission enable him to synthesize information into diamonds for all of us! What you want is accessible by taking in this show!

  • Excellent Information
    by Stallion golf from United States

    Great advice and information with a wonderful blend of topics! Loved the episode with the british healthcare professional and the ideas shared on how to make the industry better.

  • Motivating and valuable information
    by Calvin Javier from United States

    Great insight on mindset from business leaders and entrepreneurs making things happen. Definitely worth your attention. Will be listening and learning more!

  • Good information
    by FIRE NATION! from United States

    Engaging interview with a british health pro, I was surprised to hear the similarties and the application she has for making healthcare better

  • Greatness
    by MiaSportFanatic from United States

    Have had the chance to listen to one show so far but man, we should be paying for this information. Lots of greatness. Thanks for the heart to serve.

  • Listen to the experts - and thrive!
    by The Marketing Book Podcast from United States

    There's a lot of advice out there these days but, sadly, a lot (and I mean a LOT) of is from people with little to no expertise. That's not the case with this gem of a show. Listen to what the experts say and profit from the experience!

  • Show is amazing!
    by BestMorningRoutineEver from United States

    I love learning about mindset and how to master my thoughts. This show provide the tools!

  • Great show!
    by Jefferson_79 from United States

    Great information for all businesses.

  • Good value!
    by Audrey purplele from United States

    Great information that applies to any business! I really felt he provided value for my time.

  • Interesting Topic
    by Real Estate Journeys Podcast from United States

    Interesting topic. Great interviews. Keep up the hard work!

  • Helpful Advice from Experts
    by ichuck2 from United States

    Mario talks to experts in a wide range of subject matters and asks good questions to pull out helpful advice.

  • What a great show!
    by Christopher List from United States

    Mario really brings out the best in his guests. The police dog trainer had such a great story. Can’t wait to hear more!

  • Great!!!
    by tommye w-c from United States

    Great podcast, awesome guests, incredible host!!!

  • Fun & informative
    by Saoirse Sky from United States

    Some people want something fun, others want something informative. This podcast gives you both!

  • Great show!
    by CJThomas6 from United States

    Very inspirational show! Appreciate the advice and thoughts shared by the host and his guests!

  • Great podcast
    by Rosie81200 from United States

    Great podcast! Love hearing about the guests’ journeys and what they learned from them.

  • Never Stop Learning!
    by Terri in Fairhope from United States

    Tune in to this great podcast and host! You're probably really good at what you do (top of your game...an Expert Authority), but there is always more to learn...streamline processes and gain more freedom in your life. It's not always about the bottom line. This one is worth a listen!

  • Amazing!
    by KatieHBrooks from United States

    If you're looking for inspiration, tune in to listen to Mario and his top notch guests. I find that I am always much more motivated after listening to an episode of Expert Authority Effect!

  • Wonderful show!
    by @IV-Heather Tieben from United States

    Mario is a great host & puts on a wonderful show. The quality of his interview guests and entire production is impeccable, I couldn't recommend Expert Authority Effect more!

  • You Will Not Be Disappointed!
    by Composer 1853 from United States

    Mario does such a great job of engaging his guests from several different disciplines.

  • The hardest working man in Podcasting
    by EOFire.com from United States

    Mario brings the HEAT with real energy and FIRE...don't miss the meteoric rise of this show! ~ John Lee Dumas

  • Great interviews and guests!
    by Mel Good Karma from United States

    Thanks for hosting such great interview guests. Look forward to hearing more and kudos on so many a week and also videos!

  • Fantastic
    by Jason A. Duprat from United States

    Awesome podcast, going to be adding this one to my list. Interesting topics with great interviews, good sound quality.

  • Enjoying!
    by Slordan from United Kingdom

    Enjoy listening to Mario and how he opens up the conversations to ensure it’s as relevant to us as listeners!

  • Nice variety and interesting topics
    by emjgreen from United States

    Love the variety of topics presented here on this show. Looking forward to listening to more of Mario's show.

  • Great Content! Great Interviews!
    by No BS Mompreneur from United States

    Wow! Really enjoy listening to all these fabulous expert authorities!! Lots of valuable take aways that I can implement into my life. I will continue to listen and share with others!! A+++

  • A great addition to build authority and create an impact
    by Cloris Kylie from United States

    A great addition to build authority and create an impact. Also, a different twist on the topic. Engaging. 5 stars!

  • Filled with motivation and ideas
    by Thomas O'Grady, PhD from United States

    Mario does a great job interviewing and pulling the stories behind people's stories or success. Good pleasant listen. If you are in a journey of your own, these episodes will give some things to bring into your on life.

  • spartancv
    by spartancv from United States

    Great job following your passion, your purpose and creating this podcast to help serve others! Keep up the excellent work.

  • This podcast is the bomb
    by Posturedoc from United States

    Mario always crushed it, and this podcast is another example of his amazing insights and knowledge!! Great work.

  • Wow - love the video show.
    by Thehighenergygirl from United States

    Thank you for the encouragement and tips on how to succeed on video and the repurposing idea.

  • Motivating and Inspiring!
    by KatyJoyWells from United States

    Mario brings such enthusiasm to his shows and his content is fantastic. I’m always learning new things to implement or new ways to grow, thanks Mario!

  • What a great show!
    by Gene_HPLN from United States

    Awesome podcast! Mario brings great topic, great guests, and it is very easy to listen to. I definitely recommend for anybody interested in business success!

  • It's great
    by Ian Ryan from United States

    Just had a chance to check out your most recent episode appreciate the great insight! Great delivery from the host & can’t wait to dig into future content.

  • Love it!
    by Brendan @ Entrepreneurs&Coffee from United States

    I love that this interview podcast doesn't feature the same old folks that everybody has on their show. Keep it up, Mario!

  • Amazing!!!!
    by Lindsey Russo from United States

    This show is so impactful! Hearing from the experts and how they take authority in their space is so amazing. Looking forward to more episodes!

  • Learned what I didin't even know I needed
    by Camilla-Jean from United States

    Great info. I love the Q episode because I get just quic interst snippets that may get me thinking about where my business might go.

  • Fabulous Interviews!
    by Life&RelationshipCoach from United States

    Mario does a fantastic job interviewing really interesting and successful business people who explain how they got to where they are - tips you won't want to miss when your trying to grow your business! Keep up the great work Mario! Coach Riana Milne

  • A+ Show
    by Gisele_Oliveira from United States

    I love this show. It's so entertaining and I learn a lot from the interviews. I highly recommend this show if you want to level up his game as an authority.

  • Inspiration, transformation, success stories!
    by Chabo101 from United States

    The title of this review should just be enough but it is just more than that. Its life lessons, its listening to personal struggles and how they over came those struggles. Love to hear from people that change the world through their struggle and the lessons that i learn from them are just more than amazing. I love this.

  • Great interviews!
    by AlyciaDarby.com PodcastManager from United States

    These interviews are well done and his guests are prepared to give really specific insights and stratagies... great podcast, Mario!!

  • Inspiring story of courage
    by StrongHeart<3 from United States

    I love that she found gratitude in her circumstances. lorie is an inspiration

  • Powerful!
    by The Food Heals Podcast from United States

    Mario's interviews cover a variety of topics and provide great value in all areas of your life! Episode 15 discusses how change is temporary and transformation is permanent which was really powerful for me. I love this message! Thank you!

  • Great content!
    by Blakeob85 from United States

    Great answers to common questions many entrepreneurs have! Thanks Mario for sharing your and your guests' insight!

  • Real Actionable Tactics!
    by MattBMaverick from United States

    What I like about Mario's podcast is that he pulls out actionable tactics from his guests that we, the listeners, can actually use. Great show!

  • Great Listen!
    by Real Estate Investor from United States

    Mario and his guests provide useful techniques to succeed in any business venture. The interview style promotes learning through real life examples of his guests. Great listen!

  • Great interviews!
    by Matt B 1818 from United States

    Love hearing these interviews and learning from people who are top in their industry. Mario is a great host and is not afraid to share his emotion!

  • Love it
    by Duffash from United States

    I love hearing interviews of successful business women and taking away what I can learn from their journey. Mario is a great host! I have enjoyed what I have learned so far. Congrats on the launch of your new podcast!

  • Strong, professional, enthusiastic!
    by pm legs from Canada

    If you're looking for an interviewer who's going to take you to investigative places to help you be your best you, through your professional life, you'll love listening to Mario!

Watch The Episode

Subscribe to EAInterviews

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Resources Mentioned

Business Book Checklist

Books Mentioned

People Mentioned

• John Kapel

• Albert Einstein

• Michael Jordan

• Nancy Lopez

• Phylicia Rashad

• Boomer Esiason 

• Dan Marino

• Carol Alt

3 Expert Authority Insights™ To Apply Now

  • Enter into the conversation that’s already taking place in your customer’s mind.
  • People want to do business with people who know them, who like them, and who trust them.
  • Imagination is more important than intelligence.

Sponsors

Business Book Checklist: Save five-plus hours for every prospect to generate more leads and find out all the reasons why every business needs a book, including your reasons. Download the Business Book Checklist at BusinessBookChecklist.com!

What You’ll Learn In This Episode

**Click the time stamp to jump directly to that point in the episode.**

[1:04] – We thank our sponsor, Business Book Checklist

[1:58] – Lisa’s inspiration to get into copywriting

  • Ever since she was a kid, she was more interested in commercials than the programs themselves.
  • She was recruited by a big agency while she was still in college to become a copywriter in their training program.

[11:35] – How to use copywriting in the business owner’s favor

  • There are different styles of copywriting depending on how the big the businesses are.
  • First, you have to figure out the problem the company has they need you for copywriting.
  • People want to do business with people who know them, who like them, and who trust them.
  • The effective way of communicating to your audience is to have a one to one style of communication.

[21:42] – How images are important in Lisa’s job

  • Images are a much more faster telegraphic way to express an idea.
  • People are hungry for visuals and pictures that tell stories.
  • Words and visuals are inextricably linked.

[32:20] – How speaking helps Lisa in her business

  • Speaking puts you in a position of authority in the role that you’re playing.
  • Speaking gives you a longer time to tell your story, to explain what you’re doing.
  • You’re always talking in pictures if you’re doing it right, it’s just a question of how well you’re evoking that picture in someone’s mind.

[53:23] – We’re going to thank the sponsor, Business Book Checklist

[53:39] – Imperfect Action Round

[53:52] – Shortest path to the cash

  • Understand your customers and give them what they want.

[54:13] – Biggest problem Lisa sees that her prospects are making and the fastest way they can fix it

  • Biggest problem is they talk too much about themselves.
  • Fastest way to fix it is go through all your communication stuff and increase the number of you’s, and get rid of as many we’s and I’s as possible.

[54:58] – Best way to maximize customer lifetime value

  • Loyalty, like putting yourself in your customer’s position and thinking about what else do they need and what else do they want with your product.

[56:11] – Books Lisa recommends that had the biggest impact in her life

  • The War of Art by Steven Pressfield
  • How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big by Scott Adams.

[1:00:31] – Thanks again to our sponsor, Business Book Checklist

[1:00:46] – www.EAInterviews.com

Episode Transcript

Read Full Transcript

Intro  [0:00]  

EA Interviews Episode 71. Inspiration, transformation, success stories and the Imperfect Action Round seven days a week. Join Mario Fachini for today’s Expert Authority Effect interview. Have you ever thought about the vital importance of copywriting and what imagery does for your brand? I bet you have. And that’s why I’m excited to bring Lisa Rothstein on the show for you today. She’s an award winning copywriter. She’s done ads for Fortune 500 companies. One of them I just found out was a commercial for Haynes. And I hope she brings that up. Actually, I’m the host. I’m going to bring that up and have her sing it again because she goes, “You might not remember this”, and I actually did. And it was pretty interesting. She’s done copywriting for Bacardi. She also just had her cartoons published in the New Yorker. She has been doing this for so long, and she can definitely help you. She’s got a very impressive portfolio. And I’m going to bring her up right after we thank our sponsor.

SPONSOR – Business Book Checklist  [1:04]  

Why every business needs a book, including yours? Would you like to say five plus hours with every prospect generate more leads and profit in your business now? Visit BusinessBookChecklist.com and learn how you can implement this in your business today.

Mario Fachini  [1:19]  

Ladies and gentlemen, here she is, Lisa Rothstein. Lisa, how are you?

Lisa Rothstein  [1:24]  

I’m doing great. How are you?

Mario Fachini  [1:25]

I can breathe again. So we’re good. 

Lisa Rothstein  [1:28]

That’s where we can choke together. No?

Mario Fachini  [1:30]  

It’s a good day. I’m excited to have you on. It’s been a long time coming. And I’m excited to have you here because I know the value you bring to the table. Ever since we met years ago, I just have loved your work, love what you’ve been up to. And you’re still at it, which is very impressive. And I know everyone that’s listening will get a lot out of it. So let’s just jump right in with the first one. What inspired you to get into copywriting, in it, branding and imaging?

Lisa Rothstein  [1:58]  

Well, it’s funny. When I was a little kid, I would sit in front of the TV, that my parents would just park me there and go off and do other things. And I always found the commercials more interesting than the programs. I was always really fascinated by these short little stories that will get told and that a product was the star of the story, but it didn’t really matter to me that it was about selling a product. To me, it was really exciting and interesting. So I got into the habit of watching the commercials and memorizing them all and then, just wandering off during the actual programs. And when I grew up — excuse me, when I went to college and I found that you could actually get a job creating these things, I thought, “My God, they pay you for this? This is great.” And so, I got recruited out of college. While I was still in college, got recruited by a big agency to come and work and become a copywriter in their training program. And I — you know, at — in the ad business, I don’t know if you ever watched the old series, 30-something, but in the creative department of an advertising agency is an old fashioned Mad Men style advertising agency, which is what I did. The art — that art director and a copywriter work together as a team. So the two of you kind of bounce ideas off of each other and then, you create, you know, print ads, TV commercials and things like that. So I would have been happy to start as an art director or as a copywriter because I like to draw and do visuals and also to write, but the — so this was the first job I got. So that’s how I ended up writing copy. And I just loved it. It was — you know, it’s just super exciting to sit around with people bouncing ideas around and then, come out, create something that you eventually turn on your television at home. I know the — I still remember the first time. I was just in my house, you know, making dinner and I heard the TV in the background and my commercial was on TV. I was, “Wow.” I went running into the living room to see it. It was really super exciting to have come full circle from that little kid sitting in front of the TV to being, you know, in my own house with my own TV and then, having my stuff come on television. So you know, that’s really how it started. 

Mario Fachini  [3:57]  

That is awesome. What commercial was that? The first one you heard?

Lisa Rothstein  [4:00]  

Oh my God. It was — this was way before the time of anybody who’s probably watching thism but it was a commercial for Chef Boyardee. You know, the canned spaghetti and canned ravioli? 

Mario Fachini  [4:10]

Loved Chef Boyardee back and through high school. 

Lisa Rothstein  [4:11]

Yeah, I loved it growing up too. I grew up — I loved it growing up too. When I got to the agency, I discovered that it was the one — though it was the account that — one of those doggy accounts that nobody wants to work on, American Home foods. It was not everybody’s favorite brand. And I was told when I started at the agency, I was around 20 years old, I’d gotten out of college early. And they said, “Oh, it’s going to be years before they let you do TV, you’re going to have to do all this other stuff.” You know, pay your dues and whatever before they let you shoot a television commercial. But then, they put me on Chef Boyardee, which nobody really cared about, but I loved it. I was so excited to be actually working on a brand that I had enjoyed as a child. And so, I came up with a campaign that they liked and they bought and next thing I knew, I was in Hollywood shooting the commercial like my first year, which they said was impossible. And it was a parody. I love jingles, I love music, as you’ll find out little later. And it was a parody on the Donna Summer sort of disco song, Hot Stuff. So it has these little kids singing about how they wanted hot, like hot stuff for lunch. They didn’t want, you know, like a peanut butter sandwich, they would rather have — they were like singing to their mom kind of like, can you give me this for lunch. In fact, I can sing — you want me to sing? I still remember the lyrics.

Mario Fachini  [5:32]  

Go for it. Absolutely.

Lisa Rothstein  [5:33]  

The kids were singing, I don’t want a sandwich. No use trying. No cold and boring lunches for me. Give me something yummy and satisfying. Something good from Chef Boyardee. Looking for some hot stuff — and so, they kept on singing about that. So that’s how it went. And so, there’s — and there was some kids in that commercial that we cast there and ended up being like big actors later like Candace Cameron Bure, I forgot what she’s in now, but like, she was like four years — 

Mario Fachini  [6:03]

Every Hallmark movie, every Hallmark station?

Lisa Rothstein  [6:04]

Every Hallmark movie ever. Yeah, she was like she was a toddler when we cast that, but that was my first commercial. And it did really super well and no one could believe that even, it even got nominated for some awards and no one could believe that was Chef Boyardee. This is like the least glamorous account that we have at the agency and no one paid any attention because they thought, “Oh, God, let her have it, we don’t care.” And so, that was — but I was so excited when I was in the kitchen cooking, not Chef Boyardee, but something else. And I heard it come on tape — I heard it come on TV, I went running into the living room. I was all alone. And I was like, you know, “Where’s everybody to see this moment?” So it was exciting.

Mario Fachini  [6:43]  

That is exciting. 

Lisa Rothstein  [6:44]

Yeah. 

Mario Fachini  [6:45]

I’m going to ask you about the other one in a bit because I want you to say that one for everyone. 

Lisa Rothstein  [6:49]

Yeah, yeah.

Mario Fachini  [6:50]

But I remember these. I love Chef Boyardee. I remember the other one.

Lisa Rothstein [6:55]  

You don’t remember Hot Stuff? That — you would have been like two.

Mario Fachini  [6:58]  

That’s Donna Summer’s song. I don’t remember that specific commercial, but you can ask my friend Kyle. He came over — every day, we had band, he would come over after school. We play video games, have Chef Boyardee and we had played Twisted Metal and then, we’d go to band practice. And it’s not — I actually want some Chef Boyardee now. 

Lisa Rothstein  [7:17]  

It’s great. It was a wonderful childhood memory. And it was great to be able to work on the product and help sell the product. So what makes advertising exciting for me? I mean, all people say, “Oh, you’re just trying to sell a product. Oh, it’s all a bunch of a bunch of spin and lies.” But to me, it was more like, how do you create a world where whole story around something. And it was always very fascinating to me, especially with what they call parody products and they’re very — people think they’re really super boring, like different kinds of soap, or different kinds of chocolate. And you know, what’s the difference between Nestle in Hershey? Well, there’s difference in the product itself, but the actual difference in like what you think of and how you feel when you think about these different brands, it’s always been something that I’ve always — even when I was a little kid, it’s like, why do I like this one better than that one? You know, why do I keep trying to like good and plenty candy. I hate licorice. But I love the commercial with a little choo choo, Charlie train. And so, I —

Mario Fachini  [8:15]

How do you hate licorice?

Lisa Rothstein [8:16]

Well, I don’t really like it. It’s not my favorite candy, but I love the commercial. So I kept buying it even though I didn’t really care that much for the product because I wanted to have that choo choo Charlie experience. And so, I was thinking, what is it about that I’d love to be — I’d love to work on those kinds of things that make people desire things for reasons other than what happens to be in the box. Like what’s the — what are the ingredients in the box? It has to do with what’s the story about the ingredients in the box. And if you want to call that spin or lies or if you want to call that romance and story and theater and it’s not a —

Mario Fachini  [8:44]  

I don’t think it’s spin or — not everyone tells the truth, so lies are something different. But spin is, I look at a storytelling — as a matter of fact, someone else that’s coming on the show that I was speaking with earlier today, we were talking about this and I go, “It’s just honesty, tell them the story because you can say, ‘Hey, are you hungry? Here’s a can of whatever’, or you can put on a whole production and have celebrities dancing around in it, coming up with a song and make it creative.” If you look at anything that’s ever done well, it’s all led with story. And when people go, I have a hard time selling my products and this and that. And when I help them, you know get more visibility and such, there — I go, “How do you have a hard time? Don’t forget they sold the pet rock?”

Lisa Rothstein  [9:32]  

That’s right. I had a pet rock. I love my pet rock. But what’s great is though that the best stories, even if they’re embellished, even if they’re creative, are all based in some kind of truth. When we would —

Mario Fachini  [9:45]

Absolutely.

Lisa Rothstein  [9:46]

When we were doing that Chef Boyardee commercial, yeah, we wanted to use music and we want to have kids dancing and singing and have it be fun, but the basic truth was kids, you know, “Hey, Mom, your kid really does prefer a hot lunch to a cold lunch.” It’s, it tastes better, they enjoy it more. And we’re just dramatizing that in song and dance and music and, and fun. But you know, the basic idea was, we were competing not against other — you know, the other option is, you know, give your kid a sandwich that they’re bored with and they may not eat, where here’s the something that they’re definitely gonna eat. So — which is–  and it’s all — that’s true. So that’s what we did. We just made more out of it than just like, “Well, here’s what’s actually in the can.” So that’s always been what’s interested me about brand storytelling and about — you know, copywriting is just one component of that. Know, when we could — when we would work together on coming up with ideas like that, it’s really more about the idea. Like what’s the idea, what’s the story, what’s the angle and then, writing the actual words and coming up with what you’re going to be seeing on screen or in the print ad or on a meme on social is something that is just like, here’s how you execute it. 

Mario Fachini  [10:59]  

So let’s talk about that a little bit more. For the person watching that has a business going, I don’t have award winning copywriting skills, but I do want to draw more people into my business, so I can help them not for the sake of just drawing them in, but I believe everyone has a servant’s heart, otherwise they won’t get in business because it’s not the easiest thing in the world. They want to serve more people, they just don’t know how, they don’t have our marketing background, copywriting video, whatever the case may be, what would you say is a place that they should start to go? Okay, what’s the first thing you should look at if you want to use copywriting in your favor?

Lisa Rothstein [11:35]  

Well, first of all, the — there’s a big difference. There’s some things that are different and there are some things that are the same about the kind of copywriting that I used to do in the ad business, the Mad Men style ad business and the kind of copywriting that most people are going to want to do for their small businesses. And this is not any kind of a judgment on what’s good or bad, or who’s got this talent or that talent, the kind of stuff that we used to do in the ad business, which is becoming a little bit less — you know, that kind of content is becoming a little bit out of style these days. But even though, you’ll still see some of it now. The whole kind of clever stuff that you would see from companies like Nike and other kinds of big companies is a different, is a kind of a different style than what you would want to be doing as a small business owner or solopreneur. And that’s actually really good news. Because the fact is now, you do not have to be a good copywriter, you don’t have to be like someone who could win awards and have like all this some kind of special like passion for it or talent for it the way someone like me might have. Not only do you not have to have that, but it’s better if you don’t, I had to unlearn a whole bunch of things going from that world to our world because the clever slick tagline stuff really — not only is it not necessary, it actually puts a lot of distance between you and the customer in our — and when you’re — when you’ve got your own business and you’re dealing directly with customers. Now, the thing that’s the same and that is at the basis of all good communication, copywriting advertising, whatever you want to call it, is really understanding what is the truth behind this, behind what I’m selling here, what is the problem that I’m solving, and the person that I’m solving it for. And I’m not going to say the whole, the old cliche, what keeps them up at night and stuff like that, because I’m tired of hearing that. You need to get inside the head and the heart and that really kind of almost play act, your customer and say, you know, what is bothering them right now that my product or service can help to solve or what’s bothering them right now that my product or service solves in a way or fills a gap that nothing else can fill, like yeah, they can go do this, but they’ve got — they still got this problem. So that’s the first thing that I do with any of my clients, is figure out who we’re talking to and why are — why would they want what we’re selling? Like what is it fixing, and what I do exercise with people that I teach in my copywriting courses and then, I also just do with all my clients and it works like a charm, because a lot of people think, “Oh, I can’t write my own copy, I don’t know what to say.” And it’s like, “You do know what to say because most of the time, you are a — you are your customer like before you solve the problem. Like after you solve the problem, like you were them once or you — at least you, either you wore them or you knew somebody like them once you know somebody like them now. So what I do with my clients, and this is so much fun is I pair — I have them pair up with each other if we’re in a room, if I’m teaching live at a conference or something, or I have — or I give them this homework to do with somebody else, maybe somebody else who also has their own business so they can kind of swap. And I have them role play. And one of them is — plays a therapist and the other one plays the customer. So it’s basically like you’re going to your — you’re going to the therapist, you’re your ideal customer going to the therapist, and the therapist says so, what’s the problem? What seems to be the problem? Oh, well, you know, “I’ve got this 20 pounds, I just can’t seem to lose, and it’s just been bothering me. And you know, I just want –” “Well, so why is that a problem?” “Well, you know, I just don’t feel attractive and, and, you know, I want to go dating and I don’t feel like, I don’t feel confident.” It’s like, “Well, why is that?” You know, “So tell me more about that.” “Well, you know, I just feel like I’m never going to meet anybody again, I’m going to die alone. And it just, you know, like it just let them keep on talking like pretend you’re complaining and pouring out your heart to a therapist or priest or a best friend or whoever it is that you would ever tell you talk to and have the other person just keep asking questions. Well, why does that matter? You know, why does that matter? What’s wrong with that? Why does life suck when — because of that. And then, the more you can get people to say that. And I always tell people, “If you’re smart, you will record this conversation.” If you do it on zoom or something like that, you can record it, then you can play it back. And then, when you play it back, you’ll find out that there’s lots of great copy in there. Hey, are you in? Are you are you feeling unattractive because of that weight you can’t lose? Are you worried that you’re not going to ever feel like you can go out and date again or that you’re getting in too late for you be in a relationship because of this? Yeah, this is terrible copy. But you can see where I’m going, it’s like gives you kind of — begins to give you a like a connection to the customer. So you don’t need to embellish that too much and make it all clever. It’s just the more you can basically enter into the — I think it was John Kapel said, “Enter into the conversation that’s already taking place in your customer’s mind.” The more you can do that, the more you can explain to them that you understand their problem. And can articulate it as or better than they even can, then they go, “Oh, my God. Hey, she really gets me, she really understands my problem.” And then, it’s kind of a quick little cognitive leap from there to she gets me to she knows how to fix it. You know, so the more they feel that you understand them, the better — the more likely you are to be able to sell your — whatever you’ve got to them. And so, the other thing I like to say, like therapist exercise is a lot of fun and you can sweat, then you can switch, so you know, “What’s the problem?” And then, just keep asking questions until you’ve exhausted all of the juice out of that. But then, the other thing I always like to say is like one of the other cliches you hear all the time, is that people do business with people who know like — that they know, like and trust. And I always say, Well, I think it’s kind of the opposite, that people want to do business with people who know them, and who like them, and who trust them to get a result, if they will work together. So it’s — they want to feel understood, approved of, and you know, they want to feel that you, the seller, have confidence in their ability to get the results, but — and you’re there to help them. So you know, that kind of relationship, the more you can write in a way that it comes from a place where I understand your problem, it’s not your fault, you’re still a good person, here’s how I can help you. And I know you’re going to get the result. If they believe that about what you’re saying, they’re going to want to buy from you. So those are the kinds of things that anyone can do, you don’t have to be a fantastic writer, you don’t have to like writing, you don’t have to be able to come up with Just do it or anything like that. It’s not what it’s about in — when you’re doing direct kind of copywriting. So I always like to say that you don’t have to be a madman, you have, you just have to be a human talking to other humans, and people like that. So I thought I’d throw that in there.

Mario Fachini  [18:24]  

That’s fantastic. That is very fantastic. Would you also say that the landscape has changed over the years and we’re more connected now where you’re not speaking to 10,000 people at once that even if you have 10,000 people on social, let’s say, it’s still a one to one communication?

Lisa Rothstein  [18:42]  

Absolutely. That is the biggest mistake I see people making, including when they go on Facebook Live or something like that. And they say, “Hey, everybody.” It’s like, don’t talk to everybody, never talk to everybody, when you’re sending out an email, especially an email, you’re talking to one person. And it’s always — but I think it should always have been that way. I mean, I think that the best, even the best even kind of Mad Men style advertising has always kind of been that way. You’re — they understood that the viewer is having an individual experience watching that TV commercial, they’re not sitting there with a group of their friends. Unless it’s like a Bud Light commercial, where everybody’s a group of friends, “Hey, we’re all friends together”, then they’re talking to people in a way that is meant to include a bunch of people. But most of the time, if you’re trying to touch somebody’s heart, you’re not — whether you’re speaking on a stage in front of, you know, 1000 people or whether you’re writing an email to a mailing list of 50,000 people, you’re still supposed to — you really are only effective if you’re talking to one person. And it’s really counterintuitive, because you’re thinking, “Oh, I’ve got this big tribe.” But every person in the tribe is their own person, and they have a one on one relationship with you. They may also have a relationship with each other, but the one that they’re having with you is the one that you’re focusing on when you’re communicating with them. Not — you know, nobody wants to feel like just a faceless, nameless, you know, cog in a wheel in a crowd, you know. So yeah, that’s so important to — and it — that’s one of the reasons why when I work with clients and this is where a little bit of my drawing stuff comes in, I always draw — we always draw together a big sort of, you know, those big, huge post it notes that are like the size of, you know, like two or three feet —

Mario Fachini [20:22]

Those are fun.

Lisa Rothstein [20:23]

— where I use those, we stick them all over the wall and we draw pictures of who’s this person. Now, it may be somebody that they actually know or somebody that’s kind of a composite of all the people that they think they know, but we’re still trying to come up with one character. So we draw kind of a cartoon of this person, are they married, do they have a dog, where do they live, or is it urban, do they own their home, do they own a car, do they work outside the home, do they like their job, do they hate their job, you know, where — do they have kids, how old are they, are they in college, are they at home, you know, how involved are they with their kids, how involved are they with their, you know, religion, or their hobbies or politics or any of those things? And we draw all that stuff, you know, what do they dream about, what do they wish they could do, what do they tell people, but what do they really think secretly inside? So I have thought balloons and voice balloons coming out everywhere. And when we’re done, we have this whole big piece of paper, huge, filled up with all of these pictures and words and we give the person a name and then, I say, “You stick this on your wall.” And that — when you draw — when you write an email, you’re writing to Mary or you’re writing to Jack or whoever this person is and pretend that that’s the only person on your list. Just pretend that that email, as you’re writing, I promise you you’re going to — it’s going to be better, more heartfelt, more connected copy. And sometimes, you really have to have a picture in your mind of who this person is. At least, it helps me, it helps my clients a lot.

Mario Fachini [21:42]

It helps me too. I was doing some stuff on LinkedIn yesterday and over, you know, talking to audiences, thousands of people, 10s of thousands, connecting with them, I’ve realized there’s like a dozen, 12 types of people on LinkedIn that you’re going to meet. So I made this little cheat sheet. And it’s like, you have the person who’s just straight selling, you have the leader, as I call him, who actually wants to connect, you have the parrot who just ramble stuff off that everyone’s saying and their behavioral types. And it’s interesting, when you’re saying to create the characters, so that goes into my next question. Let’s go from the words, the copy in the text to the images. How would you say that the images are important for what you’re doing?

Lisa Rothstein  [22:26]  

Images are so important. And I know, speaking as a writer, it sounds like kind of weird, but I mean, words by themselves are very limited. They — and especially when people — I see people who write copy who aren’t as confident in their ability to just be natural and authentic. And they come across like they write all this corporate jargon sounding stuff that sounds really super smart and intelligent, but I — you read a paragraph, it’s like, I don’t even know what that means. What does that even mean? So you’re so confused. That confusion is the opposite of connection. I mean, you’ve heard of confused mind says no, but it’s like you’re connected or you’re confused, you can’t be both. And so, it’s really important to be super, super clear, and really, you know, down to earth. And some images are much more faster telegraphic way to express an idea. That’s why I love drawing cartoons, especially this kind of stuff that you see in the New Yorker, which is very kind of, you know, you see — hopefully, you get it right away. So So it’s really — you — the words and pictures really, really go together. So whether you’re doing video or even if you’re writing a sales copy and you’ve got like images on the page, really need — first of all, you need to break up text, long text is death. You know, if I see a bunch of words, nobody wants to read, you know, so when I see a bunch of words, you know, I just tune out but when you see pictures kind of, whether they’re hand drawn or whether they’re photographs, just kind of leading you through the page, then you at least have an idea of what story are you telling. And I think it’s sad when you’re a kid, you got picture books, and you got big pictures and just very few words, and the older you get, the words get — the words take up more of the page and the pictures take up less of the page until you’re all words and no pictures at all. And I think that people are really starved for pictures that tells stories and that I’ve seen evidence in the fact that graphic novels and things have gotten so much more popular with adults in the past couple of decades. And maybe that just — that we’re just so much more visual now because we’re always on social media and everything. But I think there’s always been a hunger and a lot of people who kind of are on the download and kept it secret. I knew guys, when I was living in France, I lived — I worked in an advertising agency in Paris for about 11 years. And sorry, excuse me, there goes my dog. Somebody is at the door. So hello. Live Video folks. Gotta love it. So anyhow, yeah, when I’m —

Mario Fachini  [24:59]  

Yeah, just go back to the part where — start back where you’re saying that you are in France.

Lisa Rothstein  [25:03]  

When I was — so there was a time when I was living in France where the husband of one of my friends was into, you know, what do they call it, in France, they call them bandes dessinees, bandes dessinees is like comic strips, but you know, what we call graphic novels now or comic books, you know, were not just for kids over there and is completely an adult genre. And it’s become more and more of a thing here too. And I think that’s because people just really are hungry for visuals and pictures that tell stories. So —

Mario Fachini  [25:35]  

Like they say, a picture’s worth 1000 words. 

Lisa Rothstein  [25:38]  

Well, you know what, I was going to say that, a picture is worth 1000 words. But in a way, it’s worth even more because you couldn’t read 1000 words in a nanosecond. But the picture that tells us that that is worth 1000 words is instantly consumed, it goes straight to your heart, it goes straight through — it cuts through all kinds of resistance, especially when it tells an emotional kind of story. And that’s what I love about drawing cartoons. I talked about it a little bit in this course that I teach called, Real Fast Doodle Profits that it’s very much like when you see especially a hand drawn image, it completely derails, defuses everybody’s resistance to like, “Oh, they’re trying to sell me something” or “Oh, you know, what are they up to?” People just love to look at doodles and things like that. So it’s a secret weapon. And it’s really silly to kind of expect words alone to carry the, you know, to carry out your entire message. It’s not necessary when you should be using everything at your disposal, especially today when people are just, you know, visuals and things like video and things like that are just so — you’re up against so much competition for people’s attention. So I guess I don’t know if that answers your question. But to me, when I work with an art director in the ad business, we always understood that the words and the visuals were inextricably linked, you couldn’t have one without the other, that one without the other would only tell half the story. And that at the same time, you wanted the visuals to carry the story well enough so that if you turned off the sound and just watch the pictures, you’d kind of get what was going on. And if you listen to only the script, and you didn’t see the pictures, you’d kind of get what was going on. But together, it was like more than the sum of its parts. That was the way it would work — those are the ads that works best.

Mario Fachini  [27:19]  

I like that. When I was learning design and video editing, photography, and all this. I — one of the things that really stands out is with design and logos. Do it in black and white first. If you can sell it in black and white, only then do you add the color to it.

Lisa Rothstein  [27:34]  

That’s a really good point. That’s a really good point. Because also, a lot of times, it’s going to appear in black and white, so it needs to stand. That shows that if that — the content means something that it has meaning on its own without all the other embellishment going on. I think that’s really important.

Mario Fachini  [27:50]  

Yeah, another thing recently is squares. Everything now is square online, whether it’s an oval or a square image. And so, many people have great rectangular looking logos. It’s like, “Oh, what do you think of it?” “It looks great, but it’s not going to work 95{d1d47f886dfada3fbec120c845cf21cbf2de07a46032aee93c7c36510b4a5e81} of things nowadays when —

Lisa Rothstein [28:07]

That’s true. You have to be —

Mario Fachini [28:08]

— 50 years ago, it was all billboard, it made more sense. So don’t just copy someone for the sake of copying them, think about who’s this going to and like your point, the audience, who’s listening, who’s watching it, who’s reading it?

Lisa Rothstein  [28:19]  

Well, it’s audience and also the medium. I mean, that was, that’s a very good point because I’m — we used to love it when we could do billboards and things like that that would take into account how people are going to be consuming the content. You know, now you’re going to be consuming them on mobile and on Instagram. And that’s why, you know, when you talk about square, but there would always be things like when you would — and now, you’ve seen them a million times with the billboards that say, you know, for like a condo complex or like it’s some kind of community that says, “If you lived here, you’d be home by now.” You know, like you’re — what you’re driving by that on the freeway. It was funny the first time you saw it, because it took into account the fact that they know that people who are seeing this are sitting in their cars out on a long commute, you know, wishing that they had — or wishing that their commute was over. So it’s helpful to think about, okay, how are people going to be seeing this? So if you’re going to be putting out a blog post or if you’ve been putting something on Facebook or like a Facebook ad or you’re gonna be putting something on Instagram, not just the format, but like where are they in their experience right now, how are they willing — how are they looking to consume things? That’s why long copy ads on Facebook work so well. What they — what we call story ads because people on Facebook are there for a while. They’re not there to kind of like just check things out and zip away. They’re there, they’re willing to sit.

Mario Fachini  [29:33]  

They’re hanging out, it’s social.

Lisa Rothstein  [29:34]  

Exactly. It’s social, they’re willing to — if your copy is good enough, your story is interesting enough, they’re — they’ll be interested to read the whole story whereas, you know, on Instagram, even though you can write a long story, that’s not what they’re there for. They’re there to scroll through the pictures and be inspired by the pictures. So you want to make sure that your picture is interesting enough and that your entire feed is something that people want to look at. So it’s super important to be taken into account both your audience and the medium. But I would — 

Mario Fachini  [30:03]  

Yeah, a lot of people don’t notice that anymore. They’re — I’m, the one I’m thinking of is what  should I do, short post or long post? And it’s like do both, you need to know your audience. To the billboard point, well, I’m not going to say the name because they’re not a healthy food, but it was like, “You want to enjoy these? Six exits away.” Mile later, only five more, four more, three more, and the last one was turn here now. 

Lisa Rothstein [30:28]

Yeah, exactly because —

Mario Fachini [30:29]

I was like, “That is awesome. Now, granted you need to take out six billboards, but —

Lisa Rothstein  [30:33]  

No, but it basically says, “We see you on the freeway driving.” You know, it’s like a little relationship, it takes into account the idea that the proximity of where you are and where they are and that they know where you are, when those things are — when you’re going by those, it’s always helpful to be as close to your customers you can and acknowledge them for the situation that you think that they’re in. And today, it’s really, it’s a lot easier to kind of get more information for better for worse, it’s easier to know more information about the people that you’re talking to, what they like, what they don’t like.

Mario Fachini  [31:08]  

Well, yeah. If they put it out there for you, all you gotta do is look at one of the profiles that tells you 90{d1d47f886dfada3fbec120c845cf21cbf2de07a46032aee93c7c36510b4a5e81}, the other one tells you another 8{d1d47f886dfada3fbec120c845cf21cbf2de07a46032aee93c7c36510b4a5e81}. And it’s — you can also generate the billboards online. So if you go on LinkedIn and you know people are on their lunch break and you say, “Hey, I’m going live tonight on Facebook”, once you get home, after you had dinner, because you know, that’s where they’re going to be hanging out. And then, on Twitter, something you do a tweet going, “Hey, I know you’re probably finishing up that meeting, don’t forget to go over here.” If you actually take a second and think about who you’re talking to and where you’re doing. These are the new billboards. So maybe it’s not on the freeway, but we have them on every single social from around us.

Lisa Rothstein [31:47]  

Well, now, you’ve got the social freeway. It’s really meeting people where they are. And that’s — that doesn’t change. The only thing that’s changed is the where they are is going to be is it — there’s all kinds of new places for them to be right now. And that’s the difference but the principle remains the same. As much as you can, you know, try not to — try to be as personal as you can. And there’s a lot of creative ways to doing that now.

Mario Fachini  [32:14]  

That’s a great point. So we’ve covered the text, we’ve covered the image, let’s talk about speaking. How is speaking helped you in your business?

Lisa Rothstein  [32:20]  

Oh, speaking is amazing. I think speaking is something that everybody should do that — well, I say that I love it. I know a lot of people, I’ve heard that people fear death less than public speaking. I don’t know why, I guess maybe from all my years in advertising where you have to get up and present your ideas in front of people, you get — you kind of — I was — I used to be nervous about it. And now, it’s easy. So it’s something you get used to. So the more you do it, the better you are. But speaking is amazing, because it allows you to — it puts you in a position of authority that is kind of implicit in the role that you’re playing. If I’m up on stage, and you’re sitting and listening to me, you’re sending yourself a message before I even open my mouth that I must be somebody worth listening to or why would you be sitting there and me up there on stage? So by the way, you’re in a — you’ve positioned yourself as an expert or an authority, but it also gives you a chance to really, you know, demonstrate your expertise and connect with people in a — in real life, which today has become kind of in a way sort of almost a novelty. I mean, I’ve just — I was telling a friend of mine, they’re like, “Well, where are your clients?” I’m like, “They’re all over the place.” “Well, how do you meet them?” “I meet them online.” And I’m like, I realized that I was working with people that there was not a single person. No, there’s one person right now that I’m working with that I have actually ever been in the same room with. I have a lot of clients and I feel like I know them all pretty well, But I — only one of them have I ever actually met in person and actually shaking hands. And so, to be — to have a situation today where you’re actually in the same room with someone is really — it’s very impactful because they’re not used to it. Now, having said that, you know, that’s not the only way of speaking, we can be doing something like this, where we’re doing a podcast or doing a webinar. And that’s good too. It gives you a longer time to tell your story to explain what you’re doing and why people should care about what you’ve got to say, what you’ve got to sell, and how you can help them. So — and it gives you a chance to communicate with them on different levels, you’re speaking, maybe you’re showing them slides, they’re seeing you, they’re having it, they’re having an audible and auditory and visual and somewhat kinesthetic experience because you’re physically in the same place. So you get — you’re touching them in all of these different ways that people — that those are the three different learning styles. And you know, everybody’s got some of all of it, but most people are stronger in one than in the other two. And speaking allows you to really touch all of those different types. So for me, it’s been helpful because I’m using more — I use a lot of visuals in I what I do, whether I’m talking about writing copy or whether I’m talking about how to use visuals and hand drawn images in your internal communications in your company. All of those things blend themselves very well to live speaking and live demonstration. And things like workshops, that’s the other thing that’s great about speaking is that you can get the audience involved and get them doing things. You can see them doing things, you can interact with them. You — they can interact with each other and you’re facilitating. It’s just a whole — it’s just a million great things about it.

Mario Fachini  [35:27]  

Yeah, it’s fun to bridge that gap. Because nowadays, I’m not going to say the name because she’s listening right over there. But there’s these devices in your home, we’ll call them big brother just for sake of argument. And I don’t need that thing activating but I remember back in the day, it was like don’t say it — don’t say too much of anything in the phone, Big Brother’s listening, you know, don’t get in cars with strangers. Now, it’s like “Hey, big brother. I need a ride.” Can you have a stranger at my house in nine minutes?

Lisa Rothstein  [35:55]  

Yeah. Well, now, people are writing all kinds of stuff and marketing stuff for that person who shall not be named because if you mentioned her name, she’ll start talking in my house too. My husband swears that he doesn’t understand why we have a surveillance device in our house that we set up on purpose for people — for companies be able to listen to our conversations, but —

Mario Fachini  [36:20]  

I saw something recently, to the point though, it used to be going to the movies, listening to the — you know, remember radio shows, going to the movies, all this stuff, it was an escape from reality. Now, reality is escape from what the new reality is.

Lisa Rothstein  [36:37]  

That’s absolutely true. But as — but at the same time, I think people haven’t changed as much as all that because the most popular podcasts, as you probably know, are these storytelling ones, like Lore and things like that. People are hungry for that kind of, you know, for stories and that’s never going to go away. That’s been around since the stone age and Aristotle and —

Mario Fachini [36:58]

Hieroglyphs.

Lisa Rothstein [36:59]

Yeah, yeah, exactly. Cave paintings. We talked about that a lot in my doodle course too, like you know, that before language, people told stories and pictures and this picture still tell a story. But it’s all about — it comes down to storytelling no matter how you’re doing it. If you’re telling a story in words only, if — that’s going to create a picture in someone’s mind, that’s what a story really is. They see the story unfolding in their mind, you’re activating their imagination, a picture is just one, one step closer to that imagination. And the words are where they have to — you know, they have to participate and form that picture in their mind. So it’s always — you’re actually always talking in pictures if you’re doing it right, it’s just a question of how well are you evoking that picture in someone’s mind.

Mario Fachini [37:42]

I absolutely love that. One of my favorite quotes is from Einstein. And he said, “Imagination is more important than intelligence.”

Lisa Rothstein [37:48]

Absolutely. And being able to inspire someone’s imagination is more important than being able to convince them with a logical argument. Because when you convince them with a logical argument, you say one thing, and they go, “Oh, I guess I agree with that.” But when you get them to imagine something, now, they’ve entered into this thing with you and they’re not participating. And they’re filling in the blanks. Now, they own that. And when somebody co owns that, that’s one of the things I love to talk about, when I talk about, you know, doodling in the office. When you’re whiteboarding stuff together, you have co ownership with the people who are — who you’re drawing — you’re drawing out your ideas, maybe a chart, maybe a metaphor, like an iceberg with the tip of the iceberg on top of the water or a mountain or a bridge, or a caterpillar turning into a butterfly or something like that to symbolize something that’s going on in your company, and everybody adds their own contribution to that picture. Now, everyone — now, everybody shares that vision together. And it’s not, it’s not me, I said this to you and now, you have to say yes or no. And you have no ownership of that idea. You’ve just been told this is what you’re supposed to do. And there’s just not a lot of buy in. You know, so when you get people to imagine stuff together, now, there’s a shared vision. So you — 

Mario Fachini  [39:04]  

And everybody’s on the same page moving forward.

Lisa Rothstein  [39:08]  

Exactly. But even when I talk about a shared vision, we’re talking about seeing, we’re talking about seeing in your mind’s eye, and then, again, eye. You can’t get away from it, you’re always talking about something visual. And it — the fact is that I think in this presentation, I did it 99U, Adobe 99U recently, I presented — you know, we did a workshop, but before we started the workshop portion, I presented a bunch of facts, which I don’t have in front of me, but there’s something about there’s more of your brain that’s taken up with visual imagery and visual processing, sort of power potential than anything else, including language. So that’s — you know, your brain is all — is set to understand visual images and pictures and make sense of them. So the more you can eat — whether, whether you’re drawing a picture of yourself or showing a photograph or telling a story that makes people form a picture in their mind, the more visual you can be in the way you tell a story, the more buy in you’re going to get and the more attention you’re going to be able to keep, get and keep.

Mario Fachini  [40:18]  

That’s awesome. I’m so glad you’ve been talking about that. Because a lot of people don’t realize it. And they just take the easy way. And if you always take the easy way, you’re always going to get the same results and that’s not what I want for everyone here. So I got one more question for you before we go to the imperfect action round. And I’ve been calling it the expert authority roller coaster, because I keep this pretty — you know, it’s been pretty easy, fair?

Lisa Rothstein [40:44]  

Okay. Yeah, that’s super easy. 

Mario Fachini  [40:47]  

And I came up with a couple of questions like, do you believe in conspiracy theories? And also, if you could talk to someone else for the last time, who would it be? Stuff like that, but I want to use my question on this for what we were talking about beforehand. Tell us more about the commercial you said you didn’t think I’d remember and I did. And then, you start singing it and feel free to sing it again.

Lisa Rothstein  [41:10]  

Oh, that’s so funny. Well, this is — that’s — I’m a little bit disappointed because I was hoping to get now —

Mario Fachini  [41:15]  

You want a conspiracy theory on?

Lisa Rothstein  [41:18]  

No, no, no. Maybe later, but yeah. Now, so the commercial that I thought that Mario was too young to remember, but he says he remembers it, so maybe he just — maybe he’s just amazingly well preserved, is when back in the in the early 90s, my agency got a new account. It was Hanes apparel. So it was part of Sara Lee. Why cake and underwear were from — were in the states. 

Mario Fachini  [41:45]  

I was just gonna say apparel. I don’t really remember much more than underwear, but I did not know they were part of Sara Lee.

Lisa Rothstein  [41:50]  

Hanes makes a lot of things. Hanes makes underwear, obviously. But also, there’s t-shirts and sweatshirts and socks and a bunch of other things. And they make stuff for kids. They make stuff for women. And they — and yeah, people didn’t know that. So that was one of the reasons why they wanted a new campaign. And so, the other problem was that, you know, they were very — Haynes was considered kind of like a really, this is what I told you at the beginning of the — of our talk together, I’ve always been really interested in doing advertising for parody products for products that really don’t have any intrinsic difference from something else. I mean, some of them are slightly better in one way or another quality wise, but basically, Hanes and Fruit of the Loom and BVD and a few other major brands were pretty much considered and perceived as pretty much all the same. Go to Walmart, you buy three to a pack white underwear for your kids or for your husband and that’s it, you know. And nobody really thought of Hanes as being any different from those other brands. So I was like, “What can we do to, you know, make this more fun and exciting and also to show people that Hanes is more than just white underwear. At the same time, in their wisdom, the company, Sara Lee Hanes had — I don’t know if you’ve heard of something called Q scores. I don’t know if they even still do them. But at the time, Q — something called a Q score was a big deal and they basically did surveys about who was — like who are the most famous, best liked celebrities, you know, around and they basically hired a sort of potpourri of people who had nothing to do with each other to be like sort of spokespeople for Hanes. One of them famously was Michael Jordan who at the time was not as famous as he became later, but there was also a Nancy Lopez, the golfer, Phylicia Rashad who played the wife on The Cosby Show, which was a big deal at the time and a few other sports figures, Boomer Esiason, Dan Marino I think was one. And there were a couple of other actors. And I mean, really, a completely unrelated group of people, some were sports people, some were actors, some were football, some were not football, golf. I mean, what? And I just — I’m like, what are we supposed to do with all these people? And they wanted them all on the commercial. I’m like, “All right, I don’t really see how this is gonna work.” But my partner and I came up with an idea. It’s like, well, what if we just show — we just act like these people are just on their off hours doing their thing, living with their families, just being people hanging out feeling good in their skin, feeling good in their clothes. And we’ll just — and we’ll sprinkle them in among other people who aren’t famous, just actors, just you know, people in the commercial, that’s basically like, look, everybody’s wearing all this stuff and anybody wants to really feel good, just kind of about themselves, about their bodies, you know, about being together and everything like that. We’ll just — it’s — they’re all people just like us. And if you notice that this is a famous person in the commercial, great. And if not, it might just be like, oh, this is a good looking guy who happens to be wearing our product. So that’s when — and we wanted to make a tagline and a whole campaign about the idea of this is not the Hanes that you’ve experienced, this is not the Hanes you thought you know. And so, that’s what — that’s where we came up with the tagline will we get our Hanes on you, which is like obviously a play on the word with hands, and we had it — and it had a big jingle, but the tag lines thing, when — here I go, I’m going to sing again. Wait till we get our Hanes on you. So that became a big thing. We did a whole song about it that went on for — you know, we had a 60-second commercial or a 30-second one. We also had one that showed all of these different peoples that was basically like look at all the different people wearing the clothes and the socks and the underwear and the shirts and the sweatshirts and all the things. But then, we had one that was just for women that we did the same song instead of a more feminine way for some — for the line called Hanes her way, where they showed, you know, underwear and bras and things like that. And we did one that was just with kids that had kids singing the song and jumping in puddles and having pillow fights and doing fun things, you know, just basically being natural, everybody being natural, best self, feeling comfortable in their own skin. And that was what the campaign was about. And it did incredibly well. I mean, the brand is still way ahead of their competitors now, but at the time, it really — most of the time, you wouldn’t — back in the day, you really couldn’t tell, oh, we ran a new ad campaign. And we think it’s responsible for some growth in the, in market share, but we can’t be sure, but this was so pronounced and marked from before and after we started writing that campaign. They kept going with it. They only stopped running some version of it even a couple of years ago. So we’d run for like 15, 20 years. And every year, I — at least while I was working on it, they increase their sales by like 20{d1d47f886dfada3fbec120c845cf21cbf2de07a46032aee93c7c36510b4a5e81}. So it was a big deal. And so, they went from basically just being the same as everybody else to being seen as a more premium, more fun to wear. And not something you have to wear, but something that you really want to wear brand. Oh yeah, we had models, Carol Alt was a big deal at the time. We had like supermodels in there too. So —

Mario Fachini  [46:56]  

The impression I got from it and what I remember was the relatability. And like we’re talking about knowing who you’re speaking to one on one because it was like, hey, this is for everyone, like you’re saying, because I do remember Michael Jordan being on it. And I was like, well, he’s wearing it. And you know, if it’s good enough for him, it’s good enough for me kind of thing.

Lisa Rothstein  [47:13]  

Right. That that kind of — I mean, now, it doesn’t seem like that big a deal, but at the time, to take a big celebrity like him and to put him in a situation where we’re not showing him playing basketball and we’re not showing him being famous, we’re showing him just hanging around at home with his dad or his wife, you know, doing laundry, and doing normal human things, that was at the time very unusual. And like you say, relatable. That they —

Mario Fachini  [47:40]  

You got that pattern interrupt in there.

Lisa Rothstein [47:41]  

Yeah, but the idea of — like this, when these people are kicking back being themselves, this is what they’re wearing. And then, when you’re kicking back being yourself, this is what you’re wearing. So I don’t dare to compare that complete campaign to Nike, which is such a huge world class thing and is still going on. But that, it — they’re doing a similar — they did a similar thing when they started saying just do it. The idea was, you know, from the champions to you, when you’re just getting yourself out of bed to jog in the morning, you all have — we all have to fight past that resistance and all the excuses as to why we don’t want to work out and why and push past the pain. And yes, it’s hard to run that that mile. But you know, just do it way. That grit is what makes champions and you have some of that in you too. And that was what Nike stood for. So in a way, we were doing the same kind of thing with Hanes where it was like, you know, whether you’re a big important celebrity and a sports star or you’re, you know, just a regular person, you want to feel good when you’re relaxing with your family and that’s what these — that’s what the campaign was about. 

Mario Fachini  [48:48]  

I remember their stuff and I’m going to add an audible in here because I’m curious. The two major soft drink companies, they were doing a lot of jingles too, was like that the thing in the early 90s? Because I’m — 

Lisa Rothstein  [48:59]  

It was a thing from until the early 90s, I would say, because — and then, I’ve noticed it recently that it’s come back a little bit. I was watching TV just today and I was thinking, you know, I’ve seen a lot more parodies like what I did with Hot Stuff, a lot more of those lately, but jingles used to be a much bigger deal. And I’ve always loved music and I’ve always — 

Mario Fachini  [49:19]  

You remember it easier.

Lisa Rothstein  [49:20]  

A lot of my commercials are jingles for that reason. And then, like after that, like in the 2000s, it really began to fall out of favor, looked kind of old fashioned and kind of hokey. So people stopped doing it. But I always thought that’s really stupid because one of the things that you want to have happen, like you pay money to — for every time your commercial runs on TV. And I don’t know about you, but like you say, you do remember it easier. And when I hear something that I really like, it plays over and over in your head even after the commercial is not running. So it’s basically like you’re getting free plays, you’re getting free —

Mario Fachini  [49:50]  

I can still hear it right now and I could tell you where I was at with what device I was playing it on. But doo doo doo doo doo doo doo doo doo doo..

Lisa Rothstein  [50:00]  

Oh, yeah.

Mario Fachini  [50:02]  

And they put little CDs in the case and I just put — and it was some crazy small one, too. It wasn’t even a full CD. But I was just — I mean, I think about that and there’s dozens and dozens of stuff I could remember. When I started speaking into the microphone, it was at a young age. And I would record TV shows and commentate on them. And I would — same thing like you, I’m very visual and I just — I remember this stuff. So when you’re mentioning it, I’m not going to give away how old I was at the time. It wasn’t a negative value. But now that we’re talking about it, I’m going, holy smokes, I’m thinking of Boom, boom, boom, boom, like everything was — yeah, when you can get people to remember it and it’s not how good your ad is, but when other people start singing the ad for you, you won.

Lisa Rothstein  [50:50]  

Well, yeah. In the early 80s, mid 80s, one of the other things that used to happen with that besides the jingles was if you could really hit like a catchphrase like when Wendy’s came out with that catchphrase. Where’s the beef?

Mario Fachini  [51:00]  

Oh geez, with the two older ladies.

Lisa Rothstein  [51:03]  

With the ladies. Yeah, the thing is though they didn’t — they couldn’t know when they came out with that, that that was going to become a thing, but before that, in the early — in the 70s Alka-Seltzer was very well known for coming up with things that people would end up saying over and over and over again. Like there was a commercial where it was like, “I can’t believe I ate the whole thing.” And somebody, they said that like three or four different times, and I guess so many people feel that way. And then, they take an Alka-Seltzer because it’s like, oh, my god, I ate too much, but I can’t believe I ate the whole thing was something that everybody said. And try it, you’ll like it was another one from Alka-Seltzer. And then, of course, they had their jingle of plop, plop, fizz, fizz, oh, what a relief it is. They haven’t run that for years, but I still remember it. And now, if they just go, plop, plop, fizz, fizz, you end up like finishing it. So you know, jingles were —

Mario Fachini  [51:55]  

We never forgot it.

Lisa Rothstein  [51:57]  

Yeah, exactly. No, you don’t forget it. So I think it’s coming back. I think — because I think that

Mario Fachini  [52:04]  

That would be an interesting experiment to have is have all the companies do it and see how much of their market share increases just from reactivating the people’s part of the brain, the reticular activating system that is already familiar with it.

Lisa Rothstein  [52:17]  

Right. They’re already familiar with it. And also, like I said, like, you know, once you hear something that is catchy, it sticks with you in a way that is just — I mean, maybe I’m more susceptible to that than other people, but I still can sing jingles from stuff that I — like I sat in front of the TV when I was a kid, I could sing you the whole thing, you know. And I just — so it’s — I think it’s a real missed opportunity that — when companies go away from those kinds of things, just because they’re not in fashion anymore, because most people really, you know, they can’t help it. They can’t help remembering your brand when that happens. So —

Mario Fachini  [52:49]  

Yeah, I’ve told my clients, you know, if you have something that works, don’t just think you always need something new. Because like we’re talking about now, think about all the people that, you know, they have kids and grandkids, they could basically indoctrinate with this stuff now. And I mean, it’s second nature for him. You don’t need a whole new campaign. Every 20 years, it’s good again basically, it sounds like.

Lisa Rothstein [53:09]

Yeah, it’s true. Yeah.

Mario Fachini [53:11]

So we’re going to thank the sponsor, and we’re going to come back for the Imperfect Action Round. This is the fun part 60-second rapid fire questions, but appreciate everything you’ve shared.

Lisa Rothstein  [53:22]  

Awesome.

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Mario Fachini  [53:39]  

All right, Lisa. Are you ready to take imperfect action?

Lisa Rothstein  [53:42]  

I’m ready to take imperfect action? Let’s go.

Mario Fachini  [53:44]  

All right. I got a couple of questions for you. 60-second answers, rapid fire. First one, what is the shortest path to the cash?

Lisa Rothstein [53:52]  

What is the shortest path to the cash? Understand your customer and basically give them what they want, not what you want, or not what you think they want, but what you know that they want, what they’ve told you that they want.

Mario Fachini  [54:07]  

Very good. What is the biggest problem you see your prospects making? What’s the fastest way they can fix it?

Lisa Rothstein  [54:13]  

The biggest problem I see my prospects making is exactly what we just said, talking too much about themselves and their process and what they’ve got and what their product does, and all that stuff. Nobody cares more about your customer and what they care about and what their problem is, even if you think they already know and change and go and go through your emails and anything else you write and count how many times you see the word I, we and how many times you see the word you and increase the number of you’s and get rid of as many we’s and I’s as possible and you’ll probably be on the road to doing the right thing. Love that

Mario Fachini  [54:49]  

Love that. That’s real good. What is the best way to maximize customer lifetime value?

Lisa Rothstein  [54:58]  

Maximizing customer lifetime value has to do with loyalty. And so, the more you can get the customer to feel connected to you and connected to each other, to other people who also buy your product, the best, that’s the best way. And so, you always need to be thinking about now that you’ve — now, if your customer buys something from you, what’s the next thing that they might need? Because every problem you solve now creates a new problem, this solution that — now that they fixed that, they’re now going to be thinking, well, now, what happens? So I’ve heard people do something what they call like a bonus sandwich. So if you’re going to create bonuses for your products, for example, think about like what are they going to need like before or after they consume your product or especially after, like, okay, now that you’ve got this, you may need this other thing that’s going to be bolted onto it. It’s either like an off-sale, like you want fries with that or like what’s the next thing that you’re going to need? Now that you’ve done this, like — and that — so basically, again, it all goes, comes back, you’re putting yourself in the shoes of your customer, using your imagination and saying if I were in this situation, I had solved this problem. I’ve used this product, what would I want next? And then, give them that.

Mario Fachini  [56:03]  

Very good. All right. Last thing, what is a book you would recommend? What book has made the biggest impact in your life, for you.

Lisa Rothstein  [56:11]  

Oh my god, that’s so hard. I read so much. But I think that a book that I would recommend and this is more for people who are creators and writers and artists, then I mean, everybody talks about this book, so I won’t be the first person to recommend it. But the War of Art is by Steven Pressfield is a great book, it’s easy to read, it’s a fast read, and it helps you get past the resistance of creating, whether it’s copywriting or whether you’re writing a screenplay, which is something I used to do, or you’re looking to do something else creative or even something in your business, it helps you do battle with those demons. The other one I have — I’m going to slip in another one. There’s a book by — that I love, that’s really a lot of fun to read by the cartoonist who draws Dilbert, his name is Scott Adams. He also writes self-help books, he does a bunch of other things too. But the self-help book that I like the best and he’s written is called, How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big. And it’s a fantastic book that talks about — it tells a story of his life and how he created Dilbert and everything but also, gives some really good advice. One of which is the idea — the difference between goals and systems and that — and he says that systems are better than goals. So if you’re going to like try to lose 50 pounds, instead of saying I want to lose 50 pounds, come up with a system that says I’m going to drink eight glasses of water a day and go to the gym three times a week and cut out wine or something and then, show up every day and do your system. And eventually, you’ll get your goal rather than just saying, you know, having this being impossible looking thing out, that you keep not hitting and feeling bad about yourself about. So that’s just one of the things in that book that I think is really super, super —

Mario Fachini  [57:52]  

I like that because the systems are going to create the habit or the goal might be a finite one-time thing. And then it’s now, what?

Lisa Rothstein  [57:58]  

Exactly. And he says that, you know, if you focus on a goal, until you reach that goal, you are in a constant state of pre-success failure. And that and that makes you feel bad. And that makes you feel less — it makes you less likely to take the kinds of actions and have the kinds of habits that are going to help you reach your goal. Whereas, if you can say to yourself, I showed up today, I put on my running shoes, I drink my water and you know, I didn’t have that second glass of wine, you can do that — you have control over that and you can win that day and say, I won because I did my system. And then, eventually, if you do that enough times it will get you what you want or at least closer to what you want, than just focusing on the goal and hoping that, you know, just by sheer willpower or by, you know, some kind of like osmosis, your gnostic system that you’re going to somehow reach it just by thinking about it.

Mario Fachini  [58:47]  

And keep it, because once you hit it, you can always go back to it. I once heard that, you know, giving back into a bad habit isn’t giving into a bad habit. No. Missing a good habit isn’t missing a good habit, it’s creating a bad habit. I was like, “Oh, crap. So once I get to this level, it doesn’t just automatically stay the rest of my life, I gotta keep at it?”

Lisa Rothstein  [59:11]  

Right, exactly. And so, when you focus on systems, you don’t feel cheated when you’ve reached your goal, then you have to keep working at it. So that’s just one of the things in that book. There are a lot of other ones too, but that’s the thing that — and it’s a lot of fun to read. He’s a funny guy. So it’s a fun, it’s a fun, easy read. So I think you’ll enjoy it.

Mario Fachini  [59:29]  

Great recommendations. Thank you very much. So where should people go to learn more?

Lisa Rothstein  [59:35]  

Okay. Well, if you want to learn more about copywriting and things like that, then just join me on my website, LisaRothstein.com. I have a lot of blog posts there that you can — and then — that you can read there or join me on social media. If you’d like to talk — if you’d like to learn more about how to use doodling in your business, then you want to go to check out a free training called, RealFastDoodleProfits.com, you’ll be able to sit — you’ll be able to enjoy a free training and that actually interactive workshop where you’ll actually teach yourself how to draw emotions right there on the training. That’s pretty cool. And so, those are those are a couple of places where you can learn more about me.

Mario Fachini  [1:00:20]  

Excellent. Thank you so much, Lisa. I know I’ve learned a lot and I know that expert authority world has to. So thank you for your time and we look forward to talking with you again. 

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www.EAInterviews.com [1:00:46]

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